Pond Supplies, Waterfalls, & Koi Pond Construction

Posts Tagged pumps

9 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Built My First Pond

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9 Things I Wish I Knew Before I Built My First Pond

People are always saying, “If I knew then what I know now…” This statement was never more true than in the world of ponds. If you are considering building a pond, read these helpful tips we’ve heard hundreds of times from our clients. Maybe they can help keep you from saying, “If only I’d known….”

1. I wish I would’ve known how much I love it I want to go bigger


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About 35% of our business is actually making ponds bigger for clients. Not only if you have more pond, do you have less weeds, but you also have less grass or other plants to water. Though ponds evaporate a little, they use up to 75% less water than the same footprint of lawn! Help with the drought, build a bigger pond!

2. I wish I would’ve known friendly the fish are, I want more

This common occurrence also results in needing a larger pond. The fish are soooo friendly, eating right out of your hand and even letting people pick them up, that everyone wants more!

3. I wish I would’ve known how many colors of lilies there are

Lilies are the ultimate pond plant. If you have a pond, you must have a water lily. The PROBLEM is, there are dozens of colors of lilies. In order to have room for every color of lily you want, you may need a bigger pond!

4. I wish I would’ve known about floating stepping stones

There are many cool features you can add to a pond, but floating steps are one of the most amazing ones, in my opinion. When you are out in the middle of the pond, surrounded by the clear, clean water, with dozens of fish begging for food, and lilies blooming away, you are transported to another world. It is an experience that once people have, they want in their own yard. So they need a bigger pond.

Are you sensing a theme yet?



5. I wish I would’ve known how much my family loves it

I’ve had many clients tell me that they are so pleased that their wife/husband and kids spend more time with them because they are relaxing by the pond together. It’s pretty cool to hear, and now they need a bigger pond.

6. I wish I would’ve known how big koi get

Koi get HUGE!!! They can easily reach a length of 28″-30″ with a breadth equivalent to a dinner plate!!! Imagine that swimming around in a little 11′ X 16′ pond. You’re gonna need a bigger pond.

7. I wish I would’ve known about Helix Pond Filtration

I have clients dreaming of the ease of maintenance Helix Life Support offers you. No dragging out heavy bags of lava rock that can tear and spill everywhere, or fighting with unwieldy pads full of decaying algae and fish waste. Helix has simple cleaning routines that don’t even require getting your hands wet, much less dirty. People love it. They want a bigger pond.

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8. I wish I would’ve known that you travel to build ponds

The Pond Digger has built ponds in nearly half of the state’s across the US, including Hawaii. After spending weeks or months of blood, sweat, and tears, building their dream pond, clients say if they had known Eric traveled to build ponds, they would’ve had him flown out to build their pond. And they would’ve made it bigger.

9. I wish I would’ve known about dojos and hi-fin banded sharks

After seeing the cool varieties of fish besides koi and goldfish that can live in a pond, people wish they had made their pond bigger so they could put more fish in.

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Leslie Triplett, The Pond Gal

Life is Short, Enjoy Koi!

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3 Mistakes Architects Make When Designing Ponds

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3 Mistakes Architects Make When Designing Ponds

Architects really know their stuff when it comes to buildings, but ponds are definitely one of their weak spots when it comes to design, equipment, and circulation.

The real first mistake they make is not having a pond builder in their back pocket for design questions. If they consulted a pond builder during the designing phase of a project, these 3 big mistakes could be easily avoided.

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Architects are known for making beautiful curving, edges that make very cool nooks and crannies which become debris catchers.

The most beautiful lagoon looking ponds with hidden spot back in the trees and bushes create a pond builder’s nightmare.

The builder must then come in and find a way to filter these nooks and crannies. While it is possible using multiple skimmers, that can drive the price up significantly.

Multiple skimmers could also mean more pumps are needed, driving the cost up further, along with a crazy electric bill later on.

CIRCULATIONcirculation

Fluid dynamics are something architects frequently overlook also.

They don’t take into consideration that the water in a pond needs to flow a particular way in order for filters, and especially skimmers to pick debris from the pond.

When that flow is interrupted, the debris will settle to the pond floor, creating a mucky mess that you must remove by hand later on.

LIFE SUPPORT AREAlife-support

When an architect designs a pool, they are typically very familiar with the equipment used, and spec accordingly.

The pond industry makes this difficult as there are no real standards, so architects are forced to guess.

When the pond builder shows up on the scene, the space left for pond equipment can be undersized, forcing us to invade space designated for something else, or stick equipment right out in plain view, mucking up an otherwise lovely view.

PLANNING YOUR DREAM POND

If you have an architect drawing up plans for your house, insure they are connected with a well trained pond builder that will help make your dream pond possible, while avoiding these simple mistakes.

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Leslie Triplett, The Pond Gal

Life is Short, Enjoy Koi!

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How Saving $$$$ Could be Costing You Time

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How Saving $$$$ Could be Costing You Time

Some people have more time than money, and some people have more money than time. In today’s world, you’re always paying with one or the other.

When it comes to choosing a pump for your pond, the same old rules apply, do you want to spend more time working on it, or more money?

Submersible pumps have been used with fish for decades.

In aquariums the pump of choice for time, practically immemorial, has been mag drive pumps. These pumps can be used in ponds as well though, given the right circumstances.

In the pond world, typically direct drive pumps are used. Knowing the differences between these pumps, will help you choose the pump that is right for you.

DIRECT DRIVE PUMPS

A direct drive pump is a powerhouse of a pump. It can push a big volume of water a long distance, or a great height. Sometimes both!

It works sort of like a garbage disposal, using an impeller to sort of grind the water up into the main shaft and push it out of the pump with tremendous force.

If leaves, twigs, or other small debris are caught up in this cyclone, they are ground up into so much small grunge and driven into the filter where they are captured for later removal during filter cleaning.

The impeller is stationary, because you don’t need to take it out for cleaning. Some direct drive pumps need to be oiled occasionally.

Direct drive pumps do use a lot of electricity to fuel their tremendous power. Here in California, that tends to be a cause for concern as our electrical rates continue to climb exponentially each year.

One interesting aspect is direct drive pumps do not do well without a good head pressure (force or friction causing them to work harder) because the motor will spin too fast and burn the pump out early. This incidentally also causes the pump to use more electricity before it finally expires.

A larger pond, or a taller waterfall typically call for a direct drive pump as bigger features want more water movement. A direct drive pump does run a little hotter than a mag drive, so a small pond could run too warm with a direct drive.

MAG DRIVE PUMPS

A mag drive pump is a magnetic body with a magnetic impeller in the middle of it. The outer body makes the impeller turn using a magnetic force, similar to when you were a kid playing with little hand magnets that would attract or repel another magnet depending on the direction they were facing. The turning impeller pulls the water through the pump.

These pumps tend be less expensive than direct drives, and use less electricity. They do not have the power of direct drives though, so you will find that they can not push water as high, or as far.

DO I HAVE TIME, OR DO I HAVE MONEY?

Here is where the “Time or Money” aspect comes in. The mag drive pumps, while initially costing less, and running for a bit less per month, require regular maintenance from you to keep them running.

Dust, and small unicellular algae, along with string algae, sticks, and leaves can bind up between the two magnets of the motor, causing the pump to overheat and eventually fail.

In order to prevent this, after installing one of these pumps, it should be checked at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months to assess debris buildup.

At whatever point you begin to notice muck on the impeller, you know you should back track by a month, and set that as your routine cleaning time.

So, if you check the pump at 3 and 6 months and it’s fine, but at 9 months there is sludge, then you should clean the pump at least every 8 months. This cleaning schedule can be as frequent as every couple of months in very dusty areas like deserts or areas with high winds. It might be much less in a small sheltered courtyard.

Also, if your waterfall is small, you should typically use a mag drive pump because they like the lower head pressure that a shorter fall creates.

One more point on a mag drive. Sometimes, (but not always) when mag drives fail, the impeller can be replaced, bringing the pump back from the dead, so to say. This can be a very inexpensive way to learn the “I need to clean this pump more” lesson. Once a direct drive pump dies, its done for good.

Leslie Triplett, The Pond Gal

Life is Short, Enjoy Koi!

Connect with The Pond Digger:

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